For the first time, I set up my circuit based on the diagram and not the guide, with mixed results.

I’m working my way through the Arduino Starter Kit and having a blast doing it. This is the most fun, wholesome use of 70 bucks ever for me!

Project 06 has us building a Light Theremin, basically a “musical instrument” that will use a phototransistor to detect the amount of light that is available, then report that change to a device that plays a tone, informing it when to change the tone to play. The piece playing the tone is known as a piezo.

Calibrating sensors

This seems like it would be an important thing for future projects, glad to have learned…


I’m working my way through the Arduino Starter Kit and having a blast doing it. This is the most fun, wholesome use of 70 bucks ever for me (got it at a discount but it looks like the price has recently gone up).

Project #05 is to use a servo motor to create a mechanical gauge that measures your mood; basically, when you turn a knob, the motor will turn an attached arm a pre-determined number of degrees.

This was the first time I’d be using a motor and definitely the first time I’ve experimented with such a level of…


Photo by Burak K from Pexels

Periodically I’ve been posting updates as I read through Clean Code by Robert Martin. I’ve posted summaries on his chapters about Naming Variables, Functions, and Comments.

These posts are an effort to get the word out about this awesome book, but also to help me solidify some of the concepts in my mind so I won’t forget them. Where possible I included direct quotes from the book in an effort to spread the wisdom far and wide.

Hopefully this is helpful and feel free to recommend any other helpful software publications!

Emergence

This chapter focuses on Kent Beck’s 4 Rules of…


Photo by Element5 Digital from Pexels

Periodically I’ve been posting updates as I read through Clean Code by Robert Martin. I’ve posted summaries on his chapters about Naming Variables, Functions, and Comments.

These posts are an effort to get the word out about this awesome book, but also to help me solidify some of the concepts in my mind so I won’t forget them. Where possible I included direct quotes from the book in an effort to spread the wisdom far and wide.

Hopefully this is helpful and feel free to recommend any other helpful software publications!

Classes represent higher levels of organization. They can also…


Periodically I’ve been posting updates as I read through Clean Code by Robert Martin. I’ve posted summaries on his chapters about Naming Variables, Functions, and Comments. All of this info has been super helpful and I’m 100% sure that this is a book I’ll be returning to as I progress on my coding journey.

These posts are an effort to get the word out about this awesome book, but also to help me solidify some of the concepts in my mind so I won’t forget them. Hopefully this is helpful and feel free to recommend any other helpful software publications!


Photo by trashhand from Pexels

Periodically I’ve been posting updates as I read through Clean Code by Robert Martin. I’ve posted summaries on his chapters about Naming Variables, Functions, and Comments. All of this info has been super helpful and I’m 100% sure that this is a book I’ll be returning to as I progress on my coding journey.

These posts are an effort to get the word out about this awesome book, but also to help me solidify some of the concepts in my mind so I won’t forget them. Hopefully this is helpful and feel free to recommend any other helpful software publications!


Photo by d0n mil0 from Pexels

Periodically I’ve been posting updates as I read through Clean Code by Robert Martin. I’ve posted summaries on his chapters about Naming Variables, Functions, and Comments. All of this info has been super helpful and I’m 100% sure that this is a book I’ll be returning to as I progress on my coding journey.

These posts are an effort to get the word out to coding newbies about this awesome book, but also to help me solidify some of the concepts in my mind so I won’t forget them. …


Source: Pexels.com

A few months ago I attended my first in-person Python meetup in Cambridge, Mass. Maybe it’s the lack of any human interaction whatsoever these days, or the crushing boredom of my living room, but I find myself reflecting on what a cool, informative experience that was on so many levels.

I can’t wait to get back out there, but for now I’m reliving that night and recounting a few lessons I learned along the way in a manner that is not at all depressing or indicative of the times in which we live. ;)

So, join me as I jump…


Photo by Vlad Bagacian from Pexels

In my time studying software development, I have probably written twice as much code as I’ve read. That’s not a humble brag, in fact, exactly the opposite.

My life these days is mostly coding challenges and project building. Aside from skimming Stack Overflow responses to issues and reading the intense and elaborate Python documentation, it’s not that often that I’ll pick up a piece of code and stare at what has been written, or commented, for that matter.

And yet, from what I’ve heard, the life of a software developer (particularly junior devs) involves a lot of reading, reviewing, and…


Photo by Andree Brennan from Pexels

As a beginning web developer, it’s a thrill just to get a program up and running. There were plenty of times when I did a fist pump in the air (to no one in particular) when I got a particularly frustrating problem to work.

But as you progress further on the journey, you may want to begin to think about complexity and challenges to scaling programs up.

As you get further as a programmer, you begin to think less about how you’re going to solve a particular problem and more about why you’re solving it one way or another.

Ok……

Dan Eder

Full Stack Python Developer

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